Canada's Cities. Canada's Future.

The Federation of Canadian Municipalities’ Big City Mayors’ Caucus (BCMC) is the voice of Canada’s biggest cities. Cities are engines that drive our country forward, creating local jobs and local growth. Canada’s cities are also hubs for innovation, where solutions are found, tested and shared to meet national challenges playing out in communities across the country. 

FCM’s caucus of big city mayors brings together representatives from 21 of Canada’s biggest cities, offering a forum for policy development on a range of issues affecting our largest centres. Through FCM, the mayors’ caucus partners with the federal government in nation-building through city-building.

Eighty-six per cent of Canada’s big city population lives in and is represented by the BCMC, cities that generate the largest share of Canada’s GDP.

See a list of all our members

MEMBERS OF BCMC

Brampton open_in_newMayor Linda Jeffrey

Calgary open_in_newMayor Naheed Nenshi

Edmonton open_in_newMayor Don Iveson (Chair)

Gatineau open_in_newMayor Maxime Pedneaud-Jobin 

Halifax open_in_newMayor Mike Savage

Hamilton open_in_newMayor Fred Eisenberger

Kitchener open_in_newMayor Berry Vrbanovic

Laval open_in_newMayor Marc Demers 

London open_in_newMayor Matt Brown

Mississauga open_in_newMayor Bonnie Crombie

Montréal  open_in_newMayor Denis Coderre 

Ottawa open_in_newMayor Jim Watson

Quebec open_in_newMayor Régis Labeaume

Regina open_in_newMayor Michael Fougere 

Saskatoon open_in_newMayor Don Atchison

St. John's open_in_newMayor Dennis O'Keefe

Surrey open_in_newMayor Linda Hepner

Toronto open_in_newMayor John Tory

Vancouver open_in_newMayor Gregor Robertson 

Windsor open_in_newMayor Drew Dilkens

Winnipeg open_in_newMayor Brian Bowman

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IMPROVE HOUSING AFFORDABILITY AND SUPPORT SOCIAL HOUSING

Our proposed solutions will improve housing affordability for Canadians, protect those most vulnerable and drive economic growth. To do this, in the first 100 days, the federal government must:

Work with Canada’s cities as key partners in developing and implementing the proposed National Housing Strategy and changes to the mandate of the Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation.

Create a dedicated affordable housing carve-out within the proposed Social Infrastructure Fund that aims to:

  • Reinvest in and support Canada’s existing stock of social housing.
  • Tackle the critical repair deficits threatening social housing across the country.
  • Continue and expand investments in successful programs, including Housing First, that provide housing support and reduce homelessness.

Take action to stimulate market and affordable rental construction.

Commit to partnering with municipalities on the proposed inventory of federal lands and buildings for repurposing as affordable housing.

Learn more about FCM’s plan to improve housing affordability and support social housing.

Quick Facts

The housing sector represents
20%
of Canada’s GDP.
For every dollar invested in housing, Canada earns back
$1.4
in GDP.
The cost of homelessness to Canadians is estimated at
$7 BILLION ANNUALLY.
Individual debt in Canada, the majority of which is house mortgages, is at an all-time high of
163%
of average income.
Canada’s big cities are ready to partner with the federal government to improve housing affordability and sustain our existing stock of social housing. Quality and affordable housing makes our communities thriving, sustainable and welcoming places for Canadians. Don Iveson, Mayor, City of Edmonton, AB

REDUCE GRIDLOCK AND CUT COMMUTE TIMES

The BCMC is focused on improving housing, transit and infrastructure in our cities and has developed solutions for shared action on these priorities.

Canada’s mayors are also leading local efforts to tackle national challenges in partnership with the federal government.

Quick Facts

The average Canadian commuter spends the equivalent of
32 WORKING DAYS
a year travelling to and from work.
The average daily commute in the Greater Toronto Area, Metro Montreal, Calgary and Vancouver is over
ONE HOUR A DAY.
The traffic congestion in the Greater Toronto and Hamilton Area alone costs the economy
$11 BILLION ANNUALLY.
Strong commitments to invest in expanding and renewing public transit, such as enhanced service in the Toronto to Waterloo Region Innovation Corridor, demonstrate that the federal government is ready to partner with municipalities to meet our shared goals of reducing commute times and improving the flow of goods and people. Berry Vrbanovic, Mayor, City of Kitchener, ON

KEEP PEOPLE AND GOODS SAFE AND MOVING

Our proposed solutions for investing in and renewing Canada’s municipal infrastructure will create jobs, help get goods to market and support continued prosperity during a time of slower economic growth and stagnant labour productivity. To make this a reality, in the first 100 days, the federal government must: 

Partner with Canada’s cities on the design and implementation of proposals to:

  • Create new Gas Tax Fund-style agreements for transit, social and green infrastructure, ensuring the agreements included dedicated commitments to local priorities.
  • Reform the New Building Canada Fund, improving transparency and making clear commitments to the level of funding available for local projects.
  • Create a Canada Infrastructure Bank, ensuring that this new financing mechanism best responds to local needs.
  • Transfer uncommitted funding at the end of each fiscal year through a temporary top-up of the Gas Tax Fund, providing clarity to cities on the process.

Learn more about FCM’s plan for an infrastructure partnership that will deliver results for Canadians.

Quick Facts

$1.20B and $1.64B
The amount of real GDP growth created for every $1 Billion invested in infrastructure.
Up to
HALF
of all productivity growth between 1962 and 2006 can be attributed to investment in public infrastructure, estimates Statistics Canada.
Improving local roads and transportation networks are priorities for most Canadians. Supported by new dedicated and predictable federal infrastructure funding, our cities are poised to expand and renew infrastructure that ignites local economic development, and attracts job-creating investments. Maxime Pednaud-Jobin, Mayor, Ville de Gatineau, QC

REDUCE GREENHOUSE GAS EMISSIONS

Canada’s big cities were some of the first governments in the world to formally acknowledge human-caused climate change. They have taken an active leadership role by encouraging coordinated global efforts to cut climate-changing GHG emissions with binding reductions targets at the international, national and city level; identifying the risks posed by climate change, and developing and implementing municipal climate action plans. Canada’s big cities remain committed to long-term action that will ensure economic strength, social sustainability and an improved quality of life.

 

WELCOME MORE SYRIAN REFUGEES TO CANADA

Canada’s mayors demonstrated prompt leadership in their respective communities, organizing and facilitating responses to the crisis.  FCM’s Task Force on Syrian Refugee Resettlement, co-chaired by President Raymond Louie and Halifax Mayor Mike Savage, is hard at work, coordinating the efforts of cities and communities and identifying effective local initiatives.

IMPLEMENT THE TRUTH AND RECONCILIATION COMMISSION OF CANADA’S CALLS TO ACTION

Mayors of Canada’s largest cities have recognized the important role municipalities must play in the reconciliation process. A BCMC Working Group has been established to implement the recommendations of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission that are directed at municipal governments, to share best practices related to reconciliation and enhancing the relationship between Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal Canadians living in urban centres, and to identify areas of federal and municipal collaboration.

Reconciliation must inspire Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal peoples to transform Canadian society so that our children and grandchildren can live together in dignity, peace, and prosperity on these lands we now share. - Truth and Reconciliation Commission Final Report